Louisana Cattle

at LAcattle.com

Advanced planning can help producers minimize the loss of animal lives and the health problems associated with all disasters. Due to the vulnerability of Louisiana to hurricanes and their potential to cause widespread damage due to high winds and flooding, hurricane preparedness is essential. And much of the disaster preparation for hurricanes will also help prepare for other disasters, such as fire, hazardous material spills, animal disease outbreaks, etc. It must be stressed that although help may be available from many sources following a disaster, producers themselves are ultimately responsible for the welfare of their animals and should prepare accordingly. Well in advance of a potential disaster situation, producers should evaluate their herd health programs with their veterinarian. Cattle that undergo evacuation either before or after a disaster will be stressed and are likely to be commingled with other cattle. Herd biosecurity will be breached, which makes increasing herd immunity imperative. Pneumonia and abortions should be anticipated and can be minimized with proper herd nutrition and vaccinations. Animal identification is also important. If cattle get evacuated and commingled, or escape and are later captured, it�s essential to be able to identify the herd of origin through brands or tags. Many cattle look alike, and plain numbered dangle tags and tattoos can be duplicated. So if cattle aren�t branded, producers should identify the farm or ranch on the dangle tag or tattoo, or use electronic identification that is unique to each individual animal. Pictures and/or videos of cattle may also help identify cattle later. ...more

 

cattletoday.xml

GENETRUST AT SUHN CATTLE COMPANY BULLS AVERAGE $5,863
Blue skies, blustery winds and Brangus bulls welcomed customers and friends of GENETRUST to the Flint Hills in Eureka, Kansas, on March 22, 2016 for the 24th annual installment of the event hosted by the Suhn family, in what has become one of the premier Brangus events of the year.
BLACK INK -- BEYOND THE BURNING HAIR
Our electric branding iron hangs high on a barn wall, bought on impulse 35 years ago but not used in 30. We freeze brand our replacement heifers though.
IT'S THE PITTS -- MOTHER NATURE, FATHER TIME
Women are nature, men are time. Women are beautiful like a Maui sunset or a forest of pine wearing a fresh blanket of snow, while men are as timeless as Shakespeare, Michelangelo and Da Vinci.
GRASS-FED BEEF CONFERENCE TO BE HELD MAY 26-27, 2016
With consumer interest heightening about where their food comes from, grass-fed beef producers will have the opportunity to learn more about marketing opportunities and production trends during a May 26-27 conference in College Station.
HUNTIN' DAYLIGHT - DECLINING PRICES MAGNIFY COST FOCUS
“Expenses won't come down as fast as commodity prices,” says Stan Bevers, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service economist. “Cow-calf expenses won't come down as fast as cow-calf prices. 2016 will have lower calf prices but not to the extent it will affect these higher expenses. During 2017, expenses still will not be coming down, where calf prices will be in their second year of decline. That's what concerns me.”
CONSIDER PROS AND CONS BEFORE CREEP FEEDING
Creep feeding of calves while still on the cow has been a management tool used for years by the cow-calf producer. The value and profitability of this practice has been long debated as well. So when producers ask if it is something worth considering, I give them the stock nutritionist's answer: “well, it depends.”
LITTLE W CHAROLAIS HOLDS PRODUCTION SALE
Little W Charolais held their 6th annual production sale on March 26, 2016 at the farm in Lebanon, Tenn.
EGYPTIAN VET STUDIES AT MISSISSIPPI STATE
New research techniques learned at Mississippi State University through a scholar exchange program will help a cattle veterinarian from Egypt as she pursues a doctoral education in food safety.

USDA Market Report

Louisiana Livestock Summary (Daily)

Baton Rouge Livestock Auction (Tue)

Opelousas Livestock Auction (Wed)

Alexandria Livestock Auction (Thu)

Louisiana Weekly Summary (Fri)

Carencro Livestock Auction (Thu)

Coushatta Livestock Auction (Thu)

Delhi Livestock Auction (Thu)

Kentwood Livestock Auction (Thu)

S. Bossier Livestock Auction (Thu)

Amite Livestock Auction (Tue)

Mansura Livestock Auction (Fri)

Kinder Livestock Auction (Tue)

 

These are a few of the topics being discussed on the Q&A Boards.
Just click on the topic to read it.   Why not join the discussion?
Who started from nothing?
by Kenany Farm (Posted Tue, 24 May 2016 19:55:11 GMT+5)
if you are looking for a success story there are plenty out there, but none of them is yours nor will they apply to your situation. if you want something (Which i assume a big spread with lots of cattle on it) you better get to working, a day job and checking cattle on your leased land at night, save every penny you can, and put it towards a land purchase, or cattle then the rest will come. the secret will be hard work, good management, and above all a good wife that would push you up instead of dragging you down.



Long Term Investment
by RiverHills (Posted Tue, 24 May 2016 19:44:26 GMT+5)
I'm definitely not a veteran but like others on here have posted seems to be a lot of RISK. I don't know if I could get past spending $150,000+ at one time unless I had the money or even most of it.


Depending on the setup i would maybe try buying a few cows or heifers and running stockers for someone to get the numbers you need. You could work your way up every year adding more breeding stock. This is more of a suggestion from a financial standpoint.

On the other hand if you have the money and want to be in it for the long haul good hiefers would be a great start. You also would need help from someone experienced and good working facility. Also a lot of time when those heifers start calving.



Prices,Prices,Prices
by yakker (Posted Tue, 24 May 2016 19:26:54 GMT+5)
Dave wrote: I ran the figures based on heifers from last week at Toppenish. It came out better than the steers. Eight head of 492 pound heifers (the smallest they reported) sold for $1.46. And 40 head of 818 pound heifers brought $1.34. The 326 pounds of gain was worth an additional 86 cents a pound.

I would like to know how others figure there gross profit when buying calves in the spring, putting them on pasture, then selling them back in the fall. Using Dave's weights and prices above, buying in May and selling in November below is what I am thinking:

From current market report: 492lbs x $1.46 = $718
From current market report: 818lbs x $1.34
May feeder cattle futures = 1.46, November feeder cattle futures = 1.36; this equals a 10 cents drop
Assume Spring prices are typically 10 cents higher than Fall prices (with a steady market) equals another 10 cents drop
$1.34 - $0.20 = $1.14 for the 818 lb heifers in the Fall = $932
$932 - $718 = $214 gross (w/o expense)

I'm not sure if I'm doubling up when computing a drop from the futures price and typical drop from spring to fall prices? I am interested in seeing how others calc. this.




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